Continuing Ed credits for MFTs, LCSWs and LPCCs

Obtain Continuing Education Units for MFTs, LCSWs and LPCCs without
leaving your computer. Take your post-test online and print out your CEU certificate immediately.

culturally relevCulturally Relevant Supervision: Ethical Practice

 

This course may be applied to EITHER the BBS Law/Ethics requirement OR the BBS Supervision requirement.

This course focuses on culture as a lens through which we view supervision. Culture is broadly defined to include race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, mental or physical ability, social class, body size and religious identification. The course explores ways to increase supervisor cultural awareness by describing a societal power grid, a social class training exercise and the concept of microaggressions as applied to race, sexual orientation and disability. An extensive case example is offered as a means to developing culturally relevant supervision. Attention to ethical practice is reflected in each section with emphasis on boundaries, self-disclosures and power dynamics within supervision.

$62.00

Add to cart

 

 

Credits:

  • 6 Hours of Continuing Education Units for California LMFTs, LCSWs and LPCCs
  • You can apply this course to EITHER the BBS Law/Ethics requirement OR the BBS Supervision requirement

This course meets the 6 CEU Law & Ethics requirement mandated every 2 years by the California BBS for all licensed LMFTs, LCSWs and LPCCs.

ALSO

This course meets the BBS requirements for 6 CEU hours of Supervision training mandated every 2 years for supervisors of MFT trainees and interns, PCC interns, and can be applied to the one time, 15 hour supervision training CE requirement for supervisors of Associate Social Workers (ASWs).

Who should take this course:

  • LMFTs, LCSWs or LPCCs who are supervising graduate students, unlicensed therapists in agency or private practice settings or those supervising agency staff
  • LMFTs, LCSWs or LPCCs who are consultants
  • Potential supervisors
  • LMFTs, LCSWs or LPCCs accruing the 36 CEUs required by the BBS every license renewal period who want to expand their own psychotherapy skills
  • LMFTs, LCSWs or LPCCs who receive supervision or consultation


This course meets the qualifications for 6 hours of continuing education credit for LMFTs, LCSWs and LPCCs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences.



Fee:

$62, with unlimited retries until course has been passed. Additionally, you may save your answers at any time during the exam and return to it later by logging back in.

Course Description/Syllabus:

This course focuses on developing culturally relevant supervision and approaches the topic from several vantage points. Culture is broadly defined to include race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, mental or physical ability, social class, body size and religious identification. The importance of supervisors’ active engagement with cultural material is emphasized. Ethical considerations are addressed by referencing professional codes of ethics and through discussion of boundaries, self-disclosures and power dynamics within supervision. The course explores ways to increase supervisor cultural awareness by describing a societal power grid and a social class training exercise.

The next section of the course describes obstacles to a culturally attuned supervision by using the concept of microaggressions as applied to race, sexual orientation and disability. Microaggressions that are specific to supervision are listed. Next, an extensive case example is offered as a means to developing culturally relevant supervision. This section ends with the exploration of whether self-disclosure is the only route to culture relevance and includes an approach to repairing derailed supervisions. Attention to ethical practice is reflected in each section.

Course Outline:

 
Part I: Ethical Mandates
  • American Counseling Association (ACA) 2005
  • California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists (CAMFT) 2008
  • National Association of Social Workers (NASW) 1999, Revised 2008
  • Boundaries, self-disclosures and ethics
  • Competing ethical principles
  • Case example and discussion
Part II: Power Dynamics within Supervision
  • Role, cultural and individual power
  • Political correctness
Part III: Increasing Supervisor Awareness
  • Societal power grid
  • Social class as a variable in professional development
Part IV: Obstacles to Culturally Relevant Supervision
  • Microaggressions
  • Microassaults, microinsults and microinvalidations
  • Examples of racial, sexual orientation and disability microaggressions
  • Supervision specific microaggressions
  • Errors in cross-cultural supervision
Part V: Creating Culturally Relevant Supervision
  • Case example and discussion
  • Is self-disclosure the only way to address culture?
  • Repairing the supervisory relationship
Part VI: Resource materials
  • CAMFT Code of Ethics-www.camft.org January 2015, Supervisor, Student and Supervisee Responsibilities
  • NASW Code of Ethics-Revised 2008
  • BBS 37M-803(Rev 1/11) Marriage and Family Therapist Trainee and Intern Supervision Information
  • BBS Answers to Most Frequently Asked Questions Relating to Marriage and Family Therapist Trainees and Interns (Rev-12/2009)
  • BBS 37M-804 (Rev 09/2014) Associate Clinical Social Worker Supervisor Information and Qualifications
  • BBS Important Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for Associate Social Workers (ASWs) (Rev 09/2014)
  • BBS Answers to Most Frequently Asked Questions Relating to Professional Clinical Counselor Interns (New 08/2012)

Course Objectives:

  • Discuss what constitutes culturally relevant supervision
  • Identify ethical requirements for culturally relevant supervision
  • Discuss competing ethical principles
  • Describe power dynamics within supervision
  • Utilize a societal power grid and social class training exercise to increase supervisors’ culturally relevant skill levels
  • Identify obstacles to supervision by using the concept of microaggressions
  • Review the use of self-disclosure as well as alternatives in creating culturally relevant supervision
  • Address the repair of empathic breaches in supervision



Log in